Bose SoundLink Micro Review

By Chris / On / In Gear, Reviews

 

In wet ski school locker rooms, on sandy beaches, poolside at hot tubs, stacked on luggage in Chinese busses, attached to my pack while splitboarding, and clipped to a paddleboard while navigating whitewater, the rugged little Bose SoundLink Micro has accompanied most of my adventures for the last six months. Here’s what I’ve found from six months of traveling with tunes by Bose.
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2018/19 Burton Catalog is Live

By Chris / On / In Gear

If you’re eagerly awaiting the snow like me, new gear release season is always an exciting milestone in the fall’s progress towards winter!

Burton’s 2018-19 gear is now live on their site, including boards (I’m looking forward to the Family Tree Trick Pilot myself), boots, bindings, outerwear, and all the accessories (including the new Anon M4 goggle).

I’m pretty excited by their news that starting this fall, all Burton softgoods come backed with a lifetime warranty. This fits well with Burton’s commitment to quality gear, but also to their Burton 2020 Sustainability Goals as it puts an incentive on Burton to delivery quality gear that will last for years to come. Through the Reduce, Reuse, Recycle mantra, companies like Burton and Patagonia who commit to lifetime warranties put their own money on the line to say “you don’t have to buy a new jacket every year, and in fact, that jacket is a purchase that will last you a lifetime.”

Worth mentioning that right now you’ll get a free 18oz Mizu water bottle with the purchase of a full price backpack from now through 8/24.

2017 Burton Flight Attendant Snowboard

By Chris / On / In Reviews

I’ve almost always had a pow board in the lineup. In the late 90s and early 2000s it was an Option Signature 162. After moving to Steamboat and playing around with the Burton Fish and Vapor, I fell in love with the Malolo and rode it as my deep-day board for a few years. Then the Sherlock arrived with a twin shape and Flying V, and I was sold on a twin-shaped powder ride. And then the Flight Attendant arrived, and again redefined what I want in a board primarily ridden in the soft stuff. Read more “2017 Burton Flight Attendant Snowboard”

Fluidstance – The Level Balance Board

By Chris / On / In Gear, Reviews

Lots of companies talk about work-life balance, but few do it as literally as Fluidstance. Fluidstance makes a series of balance boards designed for working at a standing desk, or anywhere you want to add a little movement into standing tasks.

I’ve been using a standing desk in my home office for several years now, ever since the “Sitting is Killing You” infographic came out in 2011. The infographic makes some rather bold announcements like “Sitting increases risk of death up to 40%,” and “Sitting makes us fat,” but does a really good job of highlighting some of the changes we’ve experienced as our jobs have become more dependent on computers.

I enjoy being on my feet. I guess it comes with the territory when spending 150+ days snowboarding and skiing, and another 50 days a year paddleboarding, surfing, hiking, and camping. But along with the adventures comes plenty of time at a desk. Whether it’s sitting down to type up a recent adventure, or at the computer for my role as Manager of Training for the Vail Ski & Snowboard School, there’s no escaping some amount of time spent in front of the screens.

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Step On Up to Strapless Bindings

By Chris / On / In Gear

With Burton’s big reveal of the Step On, snowboarding’s worst kept secret of the last year is finally official – the step in binding is back.

Photo: Gabe L’Heureux / Transworld

For the last few decades, many of us have been deriding step-ins. They were heavy, clunky, unreliable, poor performing, pieces of junk that were just as likely to accidentally release as they were to ice up and refuse to attach. Similar to binding “advancements” that swivel the front binding, add levered brakes, or automatically close the ankle straps, step-ins were just another great intentioned, but overly complicated invention. As a result, they were unable to compete with the simplicity, weight, and reliability of traditional straps.

Despite the disdain mainstream snowboarding threw at them, step-ins found a niche of die-hard followers that put new liners in their beat up old boots, search for replacement binding parts online, seek out gear at garage sales, and post in forums about their love for step-ins.

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